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Economic benefits of culture on Western Provinces, June 22, 2016

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Hill-Strategies-rptEconomic benefits of culture on Western Provinces, June 22, 2016

Western provincial estimates from Provincial and Territorial Culture Indicators, 2010 to 2014

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• British Columbia

The direct contribution of culture industries to GDP was $7.2 billion in British Columbia in 2014, or 3.3% of provincial GDP. The value added of culture industries in B.C., as a proportion of total provincial GDP, is equal to the national average (also 3.3%).

In 2014, there were 87,800 jobs directly related to culture industries in B.C., or 3.8% of the province’s 2.3 million jobs. This percentage is close to the national average (3.9%).

In B.C., the GDP of culture industries is larger than the value added of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting ($4.4 billion), utilities ($4.7 billion), and accommodation and food services ($6.3 billion). However, the value added of culture is less than that of educational services ($11.3 billion), transportation and warehousing ($12.0 billion), and construction ($16.8 billion).

The PTCI also provides an estimate of the GDP of sports industries in 2014 ($979 million, or 0.4% of the province’s GDP). The value added of culture ($7.2 billion) is over seven times larger than the sports estimate.

Between 2010 and 2014, the GDP of culture industries grew by 17%, compared with a 16% increase in the overall provincial economy. This resulted in a slight increase in the culture industries’ share of the overall economy from 3.2% in 2010 to 3.3% in 2014.

• Alberta

The direct contribution of culture industries to GDP was $6.5 billion in Alberta in 2014 (1.8% of provincial GDP). The value added of culture industries in Alberta, as a proportion of the province’s overall GDP, is well below the national average (3.3%).

In 2014, there were 61,800 jobs directly related to culture industries in Alberta, or 2.7% of the 2.3 million jobs in the province. This percentage is also below the national average (3.9%).

In Alberta, the GDP of culture industries is larger than the value added of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting ($4.9 billion) and utilities ($5.2 billion). On the other hand, the value added of culture is less than that of accommodation and food services ($7.0 billion), educational services ($11.3 billion), transportation and warehousing ($15.4 billion), and construction ($42.3 billion).

The PTCI also provides an estimate of the GDP of sports industries in 2014 ($780 million, or 0.2% of the province’s GDP). The value added of culture ($6.5 billion) is over eight times larger than the sports estimate.

Between 2010 and 2014, the GDP of culture industries grew by 19%, compared with a 39% increase in the overall provincial economy. This resulted in a decrease in the culture industries’ share of the overall economy from 2.1% in 2010 to 1.8% in 2014.

• Saskatchewan

The direct contribution of culture industries to GDP was $1.4 billion in Saskatchewan in 2014, or 1.8% of provincial GDP. The value added of culture industries in Saskatchewan, as a proportion of total provincial GDP, is well below the national average (3.3%).

In 2014, there were 15,600 jobs directly related to culture industries in Saskatchewan, or 2.6% of the province’s 700,000 jobs. This percentage is also below the national average (3.9%).

In Saskatchewan, the GDP of culture industries is larger than the impact of accommodation and food services ($1.2 billion). However, the value added of culture is less than that of utilities ($1.8 billion), educational services ($3.1 billion), transportation and warehousing ($3.8 billion), agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting ($5.3 billion), and construction ($7.0 billion).

The PTCI also provides an estimate of the GDP of sports industries in 2014 ($198 million, or 0.3% of the province’s GDP). The value added of culture ($1.4 billion) is about seven times larger than the sports estimate.

Between 2010 and 2014, the GDP of culture industries grew by 18%. During the same timeframe, the overall provincial economy grew by 31%, resulting in a decrease in the culture industries’ share of the overall economy from 2.0% in 2010 to 1.8% in 2014.

• Manitoba

The direct contribution of culture industries to GDP was $1.6 billion in Manitoba in 2014 (2.7% of provincial GDP). The value added of culture industries in Manitoba, as a proportion of the province’s overall GDP, is below the national average (3.3%).

In 2014, there were 21,200 jobs directly related to culture industries in Manitoba, or 3.2% of the 658,000 jobs in the province. This percentage is also below the national average (3.9%).

In Manitoba, the GDP of culture industries is larger than the value added of accommodation and food services ($1.1 billion). On the other hand, the value added of culture is less than that of agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting ($2.1 billion), utilities ($2.2 billion), educational services ($3.2 billion), transportation and warehousing ($3.5 billion), and construction ($4.6 billion).

The PTCI also provides an estimate of the GDP of sports industries in 2014 ($167 million, or 0.3% of the province’s GDP). The value added of culture ($1.6 billion) is about ten times larger than the sports estimate.

Between 2010 and 2014, the GDP of culture industries grew by 22%, compared with a 19% increase in the overall provincial economy. There was no change in the culture industries’ share of the overall economy (2.7% in 2010 and 2014).

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